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Honoring National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

 

 

The Fight Is Not Over: Celebrating and Honoring National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

HIV/AIDS remains a significant problem and continues to disproportionately impact the African diaspora. Black people living in US southern states – those infamous localities for the involuntary servitude of Africans, the lynching of Black bodies, and Jim Crow laws restricting Black opportunity and advancement – make up 44% of people living with HIV and 54% of those newly infected. When the President of the United States (allegedly) labels the ancestral homes of Black people as “shit-hole countries” and declares that all Haitians “have AIDS,” the directive of the 2018 NBHAAD theme is clear: “Stay the Course, the Fight is Not Over!”

HIV Prevention and Treatment as a Right for Black People and Others

Throughout the US, there has been greater attention placed on the lived experiences of African Americans, Afro-Latinos and other Africans living in the United states, especially in our pursuits of justice related to police violence and interactions; educational and workforce opportunities; access to health care; and citizenship. Our organizing and mobilization with Black Lives Matter, the Women’s March and the March for Science allows us to publicly speak against these injustices and nurture efforts that assert HIV prevention and treatment as a right.

Expanding the Fight

In fact, all HIV/AIDS, civil rights, and justice organizations must assert that Black people have the right to “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness”, along with living HIV free. This requires a collective will that is able to recognize root injustices and engage in sustained dialogue and actions that interrupt the status quo. No longer can this fight be viewed as the sole responsibility of local health departments, community organizations and people living with HIV. Public and private schools, religious institutions, business leaders and other influencers must learn, promote, and, if applicable, use the latest advancements in HIV prevention and treatment, including PrEP for HIV-negative individuals and the gospel of Undetectable = Untransmittable. Highlighting individuals and organizations operating in these spaces of engagement will help inform cross-sector partnerships that equip communities with the tools and resources to do this work effectively and efficiently.

Nurture the Frontline

As with any campaign for justice, it is important to nurture those individuals and organizations on the frontline – including those living with HIV, those in communities disproportionately affected by it, and those organizations that use their resources to fight against it.  By keeping these individuals and organizations healthy, they are in ready-position to provide support. National organizations can set an example for local organizations by addressing racial and gender equity and developing campaigns that identify and highlight the needs of front line staff workers – whether it is guidance for employers to maximize employee assistance benefits, saving and investing in retirement accounts, or ensuring avenues for skill development in transferrable areas (e.g. medical coding, data collection, or phlebotomy). Black unemployment, especially when compared to White unemployment, is unacceptably high.

Measure our Performance

Knowing if our efforts are making a difference is important for designing strategies to end HIV and promote justice in Black communities. The National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) offers a data-guided approach for key actions and measuring impact in the local and national context. The NHAS milestones and indicators can also inspire our tracking of other indicators and data points that describe mobilization efforts, membership dynamics, and engagement around policy. By participating in these activities, we are better able to identify collective approaches that successfully work in Black communities. Occupying this space also allows UCHAPS and others to sustain their operations, resources and passion to do even more.

Stay the Course, the Fight is Not Over

In 1926, Carter G. Woodson started Negro History Week, which is now celebrated throughout the entire month of February (and yearly for some). It’s a reminder of the great contributions and struggles faced by Black people in the US and throughout the world. Similarly, NBHAAD provides an opportunity to unite our contemporary fight against HIV within this rich historical legacy for recognition, freedom and liberation. Today, UCHAPS encourages everyone to expand the fight, nurture the frontline and measure our performance to help end HIV, protect Dreamers and DACA, fight against police brutality, create Black wealth, and achieve political liberation.

Stay the course. The fight is not over.

Cuts that Hurt: What the President’s FY18 Budget Proposal Means for HIV services and people of color

 

 

 

 

 

President Trump’s FY18 budget proposal included several cuts that would directly impact people of color (POC) living with or vulnerable to HIV. It is important to remember that the President’s budget recommendations are only the start of the budget process. Congress makes the final decision on funding for the government.

YOU CAN HELP: It is very important that our elected officials hear from us to save our services for HIV prevention and care. Please join us for this year’s HIV/STD Action Day on September 6 2017, the day before the start of the 2017 United States Conference on AIDS, and speak to your Member of Congress directly or organize an effort in your own local district.

Secretary’s Minority AIDS Initiative Fund (SMAIF)

The President’s FY18 budget request eliminates funding at this critical time in the SMAIF’s existence. Each year, the SMAIF provides over $50 million to support a wide range of activities designed to support communities of color (including, but, not limited to projects that: (1) get and keep people of color in care; (2) build leadership among people of color at the local level who are either living with or affected by HIV, and (3) address Hepatitis C in those living with HIV).

  • POC  IMPACT:  The  proposed  elimination  of  the  SMAIF  would  remove  a  key  resource  that promotes innovative and cost-­effective programs specifically tailored for communities of color and that influence HIV related programs across the entire Department of Health and Human Services.

Cuts to the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program will
↑ Increase health inequities
↓ Reduce support services for persons living with HIV

Although  praised  by  the  Administration,  the  President’s  FY18  budget  request  decreases funding for the Ryan White program by $59 million (eliminating funding for  the  AIDS  Education  and  Training  Centers  (AETC)  which  train  medical  professional and Special Projects of National Significance (SPNS) programs).

  • POC IMPACT: The proposed cuts to the AETCs will reduce access to important training programs that help the healthcare workforce prepare to meet the needs of clients seeking HIV-related services – particularly, people of color.
  • POC IMPACT: The proposed cuts to the SPNS will stall: (1) evaluation of treatment models; (2) dissemination and replication of successful interventions; (3) capacity-­building in the health information technology systems of the Ryan White program.

Cuts to HIV Prevention will likely cause
Community-­Based Organizations (CBOs) near you to lose funding or close
+30,000 more Americans will become HIV-­positive
‐ 1,000,000 fewer HIV tests will be performed

The President’s FY18 budget request reduces the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) funding for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, Sexually Transmitted Infections and Tuberculosis by $186.1 million. The proposed cuts to CDC would scale-­down local HIV prevention activities  that  have  just  started  to  reach  communities  of  color,  including  support  for  pre-­exposure  prophylaxis (PrEP) as well as efforts around treatment as prevention which would deeply harm the communities most vulnerable to HIV.

  • POC IMPACT: The proposed cuts to CDC threaten the existence of CBOs as cuts to their HIV prevention funding would greatly reduce services including testing, linkage services, prevention campaigns, and health education programs. Thousands more people will be unaware of their HIV status and those who need care will not be linked to life‐sustaining services.

Cuts to Medicaid will likely cause Millions to lose their Medicaid Coverage

The President’s FY18 budget request cuts $610 billion (over 10 years) to this joint federal/state program that provides healthcare services for people with limited income and resources. Medicaid remains one of the largest payers of insurance for people living with HIV.

  • The proposed cuts to Medicaid would especially impact communities of color and put their health and well-­being at-­risk since they will lose their access to HIV prevention and treatment services.

Cuts to National Institutes of Health (NIH) will Adversely impact the Office of AIDS Research (OAR)

The President’s FY18 budget request reduces funding by nearly $5.8 million. Such a large cut would likely harm researchers’ ability to find new prevention strategies and to make sure treatment options meet the needs of those on treatment.

  • POC IMPACT: The President’s FY18 budget request proposes the elimination of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). With an emphasis on health disparities experienced by persons of color when they access healthcare services, AHRQ produces the annual National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Report as well as periodic updates on the National Quality Strategy.
  • POC IMPACT: The proposed cuts to NIH greatly undermine current long­‐term research on HIV vaccines and the hunt for a cure for HIV. Both Black and Latinos continue to be disproportionately affected by HIV and in need of HIV-­related services.

Cuts to the Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) Program will likely cause more than 33,000 homeless People Living with HIV (PLWH) to lose housing support services

Despite being praised by the Administration, the President’s FY18 budget request proposes cutting HOPWA by approximately $26 million dollars.

  • POC IMPACT: The proposed cuts to HOPWA would reduce funding to below FY16 levels (although the 2016 levels were deemed inadequate and the HOPWA formula was updated by the Housing Opportunity through Modernization Act (HOTMA) in 2016).
  • POC IMPACT: The proposed cuts to HOPWA would reduce funding to below FY16 levels (although the 2016 levels were deemed inadequate and the HOPWA formula was updated by the Housing Opportunity through Modernization Act (HOTMA) in 2016). Several thousand fewer homes will be available for homeless or housing unstable PLWH.

Cuts to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) will
‐ Reduce the SAMHSA Minority AIDS Initiative Funds by $17.7 million

The President’s FY18 budget request decreases SAMHSA funding by $374 million.

  • POC IMPACT: The proposed cuts to SAMHSA would directly impact communities of color since, in 2015, 65% of those who identified injection drug use as the mode of HIV transmission were people of color.
    • Specifically, the SAMHSA Minority AIDS Initiative Funds will reduce the resources available for substance use-­related HIV prevention and treatment programs focused on engaging people of color.

GOOD NEWS→

The President’s FY18 budget proposal is just a recommendation to Congress and only the first step in the Federal Budget Process:

Step 1: The President’s Budget Request

  • The President submits a detailed budget request for the coming fiscal year, which begins on October 1.

Step 2: The Congressional Budget Resolution

  • Congress usually holds hearings to question Administration officials about federal agency funding requests
  • Congress usually holds hearings to question Administration officials about federal agency funding requests
  • The federal House and Senate Budget Committees then develops its own budget resolution (which are supposed to be filed by April 15th)
  • The full House and Senate then vote on its own budget plan (only a majority vote is required to pass)

Step 3: Enacting Budget Legislation

  • The federal House and Senate Appropriations Committees determine program-­by-­program funding levels in 12 separate bills
  • The federal House and Senate Appropriations Committees determine program-­by-­program funding levels in 12 separate bills
  • Most HIV related programing is determined in the Labor­-Health and Human Services­-Education and Related Agencies appropriations bill

TAKE HOME MESSAGE→ The final distribution of funds is ENTIRELY in the hands of Congress

END THE EPIDEMIC / DIGITAL

End the Epidemic, In Part by Digital Communication

WORLD AIDS DAY, FLORIDA HEALTH IN ST. LUCIE COUNTIES

November 30, 2017

ON WORLD AIDS DAY, FLORIDA HEALTH

IN ST. LUCIE CONTINUES FIGHT AGAINST

HIV/AIDS

Contact:

Arlease Hall Arlease.Hall@FLHealth.gov

772-370-1391

St. Lucie County, FL — As the Florida Department of Health in St. Lucie (DOH-St. Lucie)

unite with others in communities worldwide, we observe World AIDS Day by showing support for

people living with HIV and honoring those who have died from an AIDS-related illness. We also

take this time to celebrate the caregivers, families, friends, and communities that support them.

This year’s national theme is “Increasing Impact Through Transparency, Accountability and

Partnerships.”

“St. Lucie’s struggle with this infectious disease became a crisis, and we were highlighted in the

Silence Is Death Report in 2006; where severe racial and ethnic HIV/AIDS, disparities reached

epidemic proportion. Through community engagement, with strong leaders we addressed the

issue through a collective impact process. Now, more than 10 years later, we rank number 19

out of 67 counties, and we have the largest decrease in new HIV infections in the state. DOH –

St. Lucie continues to remain vigilant in addressing HIV/AIDS in St. Lucie, because we

understand the impact this disease has on families and a community”, said Clint Sperber,

Health Officer and Administrator of the Florida Department of Health in St. Lucie.

Over 1.1 million people in the US are living with HIV, and 1 in 7 of them don’t know it. The

department remains fully committed to fighting the spread of HIV in Florida and helping connect

individuals who are positive with lifesaving treatment and services.

Florida is a national leader in HIV testing. DOH and our partners throughout Florida have made

great strides in prevention, identifying infections early and getting people into treatment,

however there is still much work to be done. The department is focusing on four key strategies

to make an even greater impact on reducing HIV rates in Florida and getting to zero, including:

· Routine screening for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and

implementation of CDC testing guidelines;

· Increased testing among high-risk populations and providing immediate access to treatment

as well as re-engaging HIV positive persons into the care system, with the ultimate goal of

getting HIV positive persons to an undetectable viral load;

· The use of PrEP and nPEP as prevention strategies to reduce the risk of contracting HIV;

and

· Increased community outreach and awareness about HIV, high-risk behaviors, the

importance of knowing one’s status and if positive, quickly accessing and staying in

treatment.

With early diagnosis, individuals can begin appropriate treatment and care resulting in better

health outcomes. Studies have shown that providing antiretroviral therapy as early as possible

after diagnosis improves a patient’s health, reduces transmission and can eventually lead to

undetectable viral loads of HIV. This model has been successfully implemented in Florida and

there are currently 35 Test and Treat sites operating statewide.

As part of our strategic efforts to eliminate HIV in Florida, the Department of Health is currently

working to make Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) medication available at no cost at all of the

67 county health departments within the next year. PrEP is a once-daily pill that can reduce the

risk of acquiring HIV in HIV-negative individuals. PrEP should be used in conjunction with

other prevention methods like condoms to reduce the risk of infection. According to the

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), taking PrEP daily reduces the risk of getting

HIV by more than 90 percent. DOH-St. Lucie is a Test and Treat site and we are now offering

PrEP.

PrEP will be made available through CHD STD and Family Planning Clinics and patients can be

provided with up to a 90-day supply of medications. Some CHDs may offer PrEP through a

specialty clinic. Visit floridahealth.gov to locate the CHD in your county.

Every CHD also offers high-quality HIV testing services. Testing can be completed at your local

county health department or you can locate HIV counseling, testing and referral sites by

visiting http://www.KnowYourHIVStatus.com or texting your zip code to 477493.

PLEASE JOIN US

World AIDS Day Candlelight Vigil: Friday, December 1, 2017 – 5:30 p.m.

Location: Fort Pierce City Hall -100 US Highway 1, Fort Pierce, FL 34950

World AIDS Day Celebration: Saturday, December 2, 2017

Location: Lawnwood Stadium – 1302 Virginia Ave, Fort Pierce, FL 32982

Games, activities for children, fun vendors, community resources, free HIV/STD testing and

“LIVE RADIO REMOTE”

For more information, call the Florida AIDS Hotline at 1-800-FLA-AIDS or 1-800-352-2437; En

Espanol, 1-800-545-SIDA; In Creole, 1-800-AIDS-101.

About the Florida Department of Health

The department, nationally accredited by the Public Health Accreditation Board, works to

protect, promote and improve the health of all people in Florida through integrated state, county

and community efforts.

Follow us on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter at @HealthyFla. For more information about the

Florida Department of Health please visit http://www.FloridaHealth.gov.

National Men’s HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

HIV.gov Shares Communication Tools for Gay

2018 United States Conference on AIDS

 

 

June 12th has been designated as Orlando United Day.  On this day, we remember the 49 angels who were killed at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando. This was a deliberate attack on the LGBT community that must never be forgotten.

To show our support for Orlando and the LGBT community, NMAC is pleased to announce that we will hold the 2018 United States Conference on AIDS in Orlando on September 6-9, 2018.  Please save the date.

The 2018 meeting will highlight the contributions made by the LGBT community to our efforts in ending the epidemic.  Our community has suffered so many losses and we must stand together.

The 49 beautiful portraits in this e-newsletter were created by 49 different artists across the country.  Each portrait portrays someone who was killed in the Pulse shootings.  They are all on exhibit at the Terrace Gallery at Orlando City Hall from May 1 – June 14, 2017.

Yours in the struggle,

Board & Staff of NMAC
Stronger Together!

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