END THE EPIDEMIC / DIGITAL

End the Epidemic, In Part by Digital Communication

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HIV TESTING IMPROVE

Frequency of HIV Testing and Time from Infection to Diagnosis Improve

 


 

HIV and Our Youth

KEY FINDINGS

1. HIV hits close to home for many young people of color.

Due to a combination of social inequities and where the disease initially took hold, HIV has disproportionately affected Black and Latino populations. The uneven impact of HIV is reflected in the starkly differing views and experiences reported by those of different races.

About three times as many Blacks and Latinos, as whites, say HIV today is a “very serious” issue for people they know.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS chart: How serious of a concern is HIV for people you know?

Almost twice as many Blacks, as whites or Latinos, say they know someone living with or who has died of HIV. One in five Blacks have a family member or close friend affected by HIV.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS 15

About a third of Black and Latino young people say they worry about getting HIV; approximately half as many whites express concern about their own risk.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS 16

2. Many are not aware of advances in HIV prevention and treatment.

In the five years since PrEP, the pill to protect against HIV, was approved by the Food & Drug Administration, only about one in ten young adults know about the prevention option.

When taken as prescribed, PrEP is highly effective in protecting against HIV. PrEP is also a significant advance in that it provides women with the first HIV prevention tool that they can control themselves.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS 17

There are also gaps in understanding of how the medications used to treat HIV work. While most young adults are generally aware of the health benefits of antiretrovirals (or ARVs), many understate their effectiveness and few know they also prevent the spread of the virus.

ARVs work to reduce the viral load to levels undetectable by standard lab tests. Studies show that when the viral load is less than 200 copies of virus per milliliter of blood, long-term health is greatly improved and sexual transmission of the virus is extremely unlikely, if not impossible.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS chart: How effective are current HIV treatment options

3. Stigma and misperceptions about HIV persist.

Most young people today say they would be comfortable having people with HIV as friends or work colleagues, but when it comes to other situations, the stigma of the disease is evident.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS chart: How comfortable would you be

Providing insight into what may be behind the stigma, the survey also reveals a lack of understanding among some about how HIV is and is not transmitted.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS 20

4. HIV testing is occurring less than generally recommended. 

The CDC recommends HIV testing as part of routine health care, yet more than half of young adults say they have never been tested.

Black young adults are more likely – and more recently – to report having gotten an HIV test.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS chart: Have you ever been tested for HIV

5. The Internet is a go-to resource for HIV information.

After school, searching online is one of the most often named sources of HIV information by young adults (multiple responses possible). Almost as many cite some form of media as doctors for at least “some” information.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS chart: How much information about HIV have you gotten from

Four in ten say they would like more information about at least one basic HIV topic asked about. More Black and Latino young people indicate they want to know more about HIV, across all topics, as compared to whites.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS 24

Florida Phasing Out Project AIDS Care, Other Medicaid Waivers

Thousands of Floridians living with AIDS could be losing financial assistance they say is essential to living a normal life, and some AIDS groups are worried the state won’t carry through on its promises.

On a recent Tuesday morning, Brandi Geoit sits at a conference table at the West Coast Aids Foundation headquarters. Across from her in the small New Port Richey office with butter-yellow walls is Dwight Pollard, a 61-year-old man living with AIDS.

Geoit tells him a new Florida law means patients like him could lose some of the financial help they’re getting through Medicaid.

“We’re not sure if you would keep your Medicaid because you’re still pending for your social security. And you haven’t qualified for Medicare yet because you’re still not old enough,” Geoit said.

Pollard no longer works, and depends on a special Medicaid waiver to cover his health care costs. Medication alone can cost $15,000 a month.

His partner, Ed Glorius, was sitting next to Pollard as he heard the news.

“It just doesn’t make sense,” Glorius said. “It doesn’t make sense to put people’s lives in turmoil. We’re better off than most and I’m freaking out. I’m waking up first thing in the morning thinking about this every day.”

Pollard is one of about 8,000 Floridians with AIDS who get help paying for doctor visits, medications and various home health services through this Medicaid waiver fund, which is called Project AIDS Care. Last month, Gov. Rick Scott signed a bill formally eliminating this waiver for AIDS, along with waivers for cystic fibrosis, developmental disabilities and elder care.

Florida’s Agency for Health Care Administration said while the waiver is going away, AIDS patients in Florida will not see a loss or gap in services. The agency declined repeated requests for interviews, but issued a written statement, explaining transition into a Medicaid Managed Medical Assistance plan.

“We will continue to provide the same services through the same providers for these individuals. The PAC (Project AIDS Care) waiver is essentially a waiver that expanded Medicaid eligibility to those diagnosed with HIV/AIDS and allowed the recipients to access needed medical services (e.g., physician services) and drugs. Given the advances in pharmaceuticals available to treat HIV/AIDS, most PAC recipients in the waiver only need those medical services and case management. With this transition, their eligibility will be maintained and they will continue to have access to the medical services, drugs and case management under the MMA waiver through the health plans. They will see no reduction in services and will be able to continue to see the medical professional they always have.”

The agency said patients will go into the Medicaid Long Term Care program starting this month. Everyone will be transitioned into it by Jan. 1, 2018.

But Geoit estimates 90 percent of her clients will not meet the requirements for long term care, which normally applies to people needing round the clock nursing.

She said her clients will definitely lose certain services that Medicaid doesn’t cover. Massages for those with neuropathy? Gone. Pest control? Gone. And services that are currently covered – like delivered meals, adult diapers and wheelchair ramps – could be lost, too.

So, she’s asked the state to clarify how it’s now different.

“When we asked them, they said, ‘Don’t worry. Reassure your client that they’ll be taken care of.’ And when we asked them point-blank what happened, you know, we were under the impression that a single adult still does not qualify for Medicaid. Has this changed? And they ended the conference call,” Geoit said.

Her program – a non-profit – exists only to manage the Project Aids Care waiver money for 325 clients in seven counties including Pasco, Pinellas and Hillsborough. With the new law, Geoit said her foundation will shut its doors by the end of the year.

For Dwight Pollard and his partner, the State Agency for Health Care Administration’s lack of answers is a concern.

“You don’t need the stress of how you’re going to pay or how you’re going to do this,” Pollard said.

But that’s his reality. And Pollard said until the state agency can give clear answers, he’ll keep searching for other programs that can help pay for his life saving medications.

2018 United States Conference on AIDS

 

 

June 12th has been designated as Orlando United Day.  On this day, we remember the 49 angels who were killed at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando. This was a deliberate attack on the LGBT community that must never be forgotten.

To show our support for Orlando and the LGBT community, NMAC is pleased to announce that we will hold the 2018 United States Conference on AIDS in Orlando on September 6-9, 2018.  Please save the date.

The 2018 meeting will highlight the contributions made by the LGBT community to our efforts in ending the epidemic.  Our community has suffered so many losses and we must stand together.

The 49 beautiful portraits in this e-newsletter were created by 49 different artists across the country.  Each portrait portrays someone who was killed in the Pulse shootings.  They are all on exhibit at the Terrace Gallery at Orlando City Hall from May 1 – June 14, 2017.

Yours in the struggle,

Board & Staff of NMAC
Stronger Together!

AIDS United’s Statement on President Trump’s Budget for FY 2018

AIDS United is shocked by President Trump’s Fiscal Year 2018 budget request released today. It threatens to roll back the progress in the fight against the domestic HIV epidemic. Now more than ever we must maintain and strengthen our progress towards our national goals and priorities of reducing new HIV infections, increasing access to care and improving health outcomes for people living with HIV, and reducing HIV-related health disparities.

The deep proposed cuts to domestic HIV and STD prevention cannot be reconciled with the goal of preventing new HIV transmissions and the rising rates of STDs. The proposed $59 million cut to the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, coupled with a fundamental restructuring of the Medicaid program capping federal spending for the first time to the tune of a $610 million funding reduction over the next decade, diminishes every community’s ability to deliver quality health care to people living with HIV by eliminating AIDS Education and Training Centers and Special Programs of National Significance (SPNS).

“AIDS Education and Training Centers (AETCs) are essential to the HIV care continuum and the success of the national goals and priorities to end the epidemic,” said AIDS United President & CEO Jesse Milan, Jr. “AETCs assure that providers know and apply the best standards of care for people living with and at risk for HIV.”

Further, AIDS United is particularly concerned that the President’s budget eliminates SPNS and reduces funding for Minority AIDS Initiative (MAI) programs. SPNS and MAI programs address the HIV epidemic by developing targeted, innovative approaches to reach chronically underserved people.

“Investment in targeted approaches are effective and save money, at a time when 1 in 2 and 1 in 4 Black and Latino gay and bisexual men respectively are at substantial risk for HIV infection in their lifetime. How can we reduce funding to programs that address these disparities? The President’s budget isn’t just a set of numbers, it’s a disturbing statement of values. Every voter must send their own message to Congress to express that they value the health of our people,” said Milan.

AIDS United urges Congress to reject the draconian cuts proposed in the President’s budget request and support funding for Medicaid, HIV programs, and STD prevention. Congress cannot idly allow the return of reduced, sequester discretionary spending caps for fiscal year 2018. These restrictive caps must be raised so that non-defense discretionary programs, which include HIV programs, can be adequately funded in fiscal year 2018. A bipartisan budget agreement that provides relief from the sequester spending caps while preserving parity between defense and non-defense discretionary programs must be achieved for 2018.

“The president’s budget would turn back the clock for years and years on progress to end the HIV epidemic. We call on Congress to keep the country moving forward,” said Milan.

The facts are in – TrumpCare is dangerous and destructive

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) has finally released their report on TrumpCare, the bill that passed out of the U.S. House of Representatives on May 4. Yeah. You read that right. The U.S. House passed TrumpCare before they knew what it cost or how it would affect health insurance.

And now we know why. The facts are clear. The American Health Care Act is dangerous and destructive.

The CBO tells us that the bill will strip 23 million people of their health insurance. We already knew that the bill completely guts protections for people with pre-existing conditions and makes devastating cuts to Medicaid. All while providing massive tax cuts to the wealthy and giant corporations.

But the fight is not over. The Senate now has to pass a bill, and it will then likely have to go to back to the House for a final vote.

WE CAN STILL STOP THIS.

Here are three things you can do NOW to make your voice heard:

Call Gov. Rauner at 312-814-2121 and demand that he publicly oppose the American Health Care Act, which will cost Illinois billions of dollars in Medicaid funding and thousands of jobs.
Call your member of Congress at 1-866-877-3303 and demand that they publicly oppose the American Health Care Act.
Forward this immediately to 10 friends and family members in Illinois, especially if they live outside of Chicago. You can also share these steps on social media using #ilsaveaca
We have asked a lot of you, but it is only because you are making a difference. Your Member of Congress is crucial in this fight and they need to hear from you again!

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