HIV TESTING IMPROVE

Frequency of HIV Testing and Time from Infection to Diagnosis Improve

 


 

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HIV and Our Youth

KEY FINDINGS

1. HIV hits close to home for many young people of color.

Due to a combination of social inequities and where the disease initially took hold, HIV has disproportionately affected Black and Latino populations. The uneven impact of HIV is reflected in the starkly differing views and experiences reported by those of different races.

About three times as many Blacks and Latinos, as whites, say HIV today is a “very serious” issue for people they know.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS chart: How serious of a concern is HIV for people you know?

Almost twice as many Blacks, as whites or Latinos, say they know someone living with or who has died of HIV. One in five Blacks have a family member or close friend affected by HIV.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS 15

About a third of Black and Latino young people say they worry about getting HIV; approximately half as many whites express concern about their own risk.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS 16

2. Many are not aware of advances in HIV prevention and treatment.

In the five years since PrEP, the pill to protect against HIV, was approved by the Food & Drug Administration, only about one in ten young adults know about the prevention option.

When taken as prescribed, PrEP is highly effective in protecting against HIV. PrEP is also a significant advance in that it provides women with the first HIV prevention tool that they can control themselves.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS 17

There are also gaps in understanding of how the medications used to treat HIV work. While most young adults are generally aware of the health benefits of antiretrovirals (or ARVs), many understate their effectiveness and few know they also prevent the spread of the virus.

ARVs work to reduce the viral load to levels undetectable by standard lab tests. Studies show that when the viral load is less than 200 copies of virus per milliliter of blood, long-term health is greatly improved and sexual transmission of the virus is extremely unlikely, if not impossible.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS chart: How effective are current HIV treatment options

3. Stigma and misperceptions about HIV persist.

Most young people today say they would be comfortable having people with HIV as friends or work colleagues, but when it comes to other situations, the stigma of the disease is evident.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS chart: How comfortable would you be

Providing insight into what may be behind the stigma, the survey also reveals a lack of understanding among some about how HIV is and is not transmitted.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS 20

4. HIV testing is occurring less than generally recommended. 

The CDC recommends HIV testing as part of routine health care, yet more than half of young adults say they have never been tested.

Black young adults are more likely – and more recently – to report having gotten an HIV test.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS chart: Have you ever been tested for HIV

5. The Internet is a go-to resource for HIV information.

After school, searching online is one of the most often named sources of HIV information by young adults (multiple responses possible). Almost as many cite some form of media as doctors for at least “some” information.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS chart: How much information about HIV have you gotten from

Four in ten say they would like more information about at least one basic HIV topic asked about. More Black and Latino young people indicate they want to know more about HIV, across all topics, as compared to whites.

National Survey of Young Adults on HIV/AIDS 24

National Men’s HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

HIV.gov Shares Communication Tools for Gay

AIDS United Responds to Fiscal Year 2017 Omnibus Appropriations Bil

 

AIDS United acknowledges that the Fiscal Year 2017 omnibus appropriations bill, released last night, provides continuity of HIV funding for most domestic programs. This is an important development for maintaining our progress towards the national goals and priorities of reducing new HIV infections, increasing access to care and improving health outcomes for people living with HIV, and reducing HIV-related health disparities.

While most HIV programs will see level funding in the budget, AIDS United is concerned that a $4 million cut to Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Part C clinical providers and a $5 million cut affecting the budget to fight sexually transmitted infections will diminish our response to HIV and health care, particularly given the increasing cases of sexually transmitted infections, such as syphilis, among men who have sex with men.

“Knowing that Congress plans to keep funding intact for most HIV efforts is reassuring, but we urge Congress to also ensure that Part C clinical providers and our response to sexually transmitted infections are fully funded,” said AIDS United President & CEO Jesse Milan, Jr.

AIDS United is particularly appreciative that Congress listened to the voices of people living with and affected by HIV in increasing funding for the Housing Opportunities for People With AIDS (HOPWA) program by $21 million. “Housing is fundamental to ensuring that people living with HIV live longer and healthier lives and we thank Congress for recognizing the importance of this program by securing its current stability,” said Milan.


About AIDS United: AIDS United’s mission is to end the AIDS epidemic in the U.S., through strategic grant-making, capacity building, formative research and policy. AIDS United works to ensure access to life-saving HIV/AIDS care and prevention services and to advance sound HIV/AIDS-related policy for U.S. populations and communities most impacted by the epidemic. To date, our strategic grant-making initiatives have directly funded more than $104 million to local communities, and have leveraged more than $117 million in additional investments for programs that include, but are not limited to HIV prevention, access to care, capacity building, harm reduction and advocacy. aidsunited.org

House and the Administration Begin to Show Their Hands

February 23, 2017

House Republicans Unveil a Health Care “Policy Menu”; Trump Department of Health and Human Services Proposes First Major Health Care Regulation

 

Although there is still no specific ACA repeal and replace proposal from the hill, both Congressional Republicans and the Trump Administration released documents last week articulating their approach to replacing the ACA and addressing concerns with the Marketplaces in the meantime. Congressional Republicans released a Health Care Policy Brief that is intended to serve as a menu of potential elements for a forthcoming ACA replacement bill. This Brief includes elements that have been found in previous ACA replacement proposals and that present concerns for access to care. Further, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) released a proposed rule entitled “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Market Stabilization” (proposed rule), which is intended to help stabilize the Marketplaces until an ACA replacement is completed. Unfortunately, some of its changes may limit access to care for vulnerable individuals and make the Marketplaces less friendly to those living with chronic illnesses and disabilities. Advocates should be sure to understand both documents as well as send comments on the proposed rule to HHS by March 7, 2017.

Advocates Should:

1. Review the Health Care Policy Brief released by House Republicans last week to better understand which ideas are popular among Congressional Republicans and likely to make it into any ACA repeal and replace proposal.

2. Understand the proposed Market Stabilization regulation released by the Department of Health and Human Services and how it will impact access to care in the 2018 qualified health plans.

3. Submit comments on the proposed rule to HHS urging them to consider the impact the proposed regulations will have on access to care for vulnerable individuals.

House Republicans Unveil Health Care Policy Brief

On February 16, 2017, after a closed-door meeting, House Republicans unveiled a policy brief and resource document to explain major elements of their plan to repeal and replace key programs and protections of the ACA. House Leadership is terming this strategy “repeal plus.” The policy brief should not be considered an actual legislative proposal but rather a “menu” of replacement ideas such as tax credits for purchasing health care, health savings accounts, and high risk pools. Part of the intention of this document is to encourage Congressional Republicans, who have found it difficult to coalesce around a health care policy strategy, to find consensus on these issues. Unfortunately, many of the components of this “repeal plus” strategy would curb access to care for vulnerable individuals, including those living with chronic illnesses and disabilities.

 

HIV Infection Numbers Drop For First Time in Decades, But Not Everyone Benefits

 

For the first time since the mid-1990s, the official estimate of annual HIV infections, or incidence, in the United States has decreased notably. According to a study released by the Centers for Disease Control earlier this week, HIV incidence dropped 18% in recent years, going from an estimated 45,700 infections in 2008 to 37,600 in 2014. This reduction in new HIV infections—the first official one in nearly two decades—is a welcome development at a time when good news in health care is becoming hard to come by with the specter of Affordable Care Act repeal looming in Congress.

The study’s findings had their share of troubling aspects as well. The undeniable progress that was made in the fight against HIV infection in America in recent years was not distributed evenly. The largest amounts of reductions in HIV incidence over the 6-year period covered by the study came from heterosexuals and people who inject drugs, who saw their new HIV infections decline by 36% and 56% respectively. Slightly smaller decreases were also seen among certain age groups of gay and bisexual men, with a 26% drop for gay and bisexual men between the ages of 35 and 44, and an 18% drop for gay and bisexual men between the ages of 13 and 24.

Unfortunately there were several populations who saw their new HIV infections remain stable or increase over the course of the study. The HIV incidence among black gay and bisexual men stayed at the still alarmingly high number of 10,100 new infections at the beginning and end of the 6-year period, while there were increases among Latino gay and bisexual men, and gay and bisexual men between the ages of 25 and 34. Latino gay and bisexual men saw a 20% increase in HIV incidence between 2008 and 2014 while gay and bisexual men between the ages of 25 and 34 experienced a 35% increase in HIV incidence over the same period. Similarly, the South continued to be overrepresented in terms of HIV incidence, as the 37% of the US population that lives in the South accounted for 50% of new HIV infections in 2014.

There is reason for cautious celebration in the results of this study, as any significant decrease in new HIV infections should be lauded. But, with the rise in HIV incidence for portions of the population and a health care system currently in flux, it’s important that we recognize that even more vigilant prevention efforts are needed in the future if we are to maintain and improve upon this progress.

Posted By: AIDS United, Policy Department – Friday, February 17, 2017

 

  • September 27, 2016: National Gay Men’s HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NGMHAAD), a national campaign highlighting the disproportionate impact HIV/AIDS has had on gay men. Despite only making up 2% of the population, 55% of people living with HIV in the U.S. identified as gay, bisexual, or other MSM. Learn more about services and ways to get involved.

 

https://www.aids.gov/news-and-events/awareness-days/gay-mens/