Resilience



By Fernando De Hoyos · NMAC Treatment Coordinator

Every year we come together on this day to honor the lives and struggles of Long-Term Survivors of HIV and AIDS. For me, everyone who was old enough to remember the early days of the epidemic is a long-term survivor regardless of HIV status. Countless allies living without the virus have been side by side with us along this journey. It was a time like no other in US history. June 5th was chosen because on this day, in 1981, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) first announced the “mysterious cancer” that was killing gay men around the country. Therefore, this day is a national day of remembrance and sharing our stories of resilience and survival, to document them for posterity.

I have told my story many times, so I want to talk about this year’s theme: “Resilience”. As a long-term survivor, I know resilience very well. Resilience is the ability to cope with adversity and to adapt well to tragedies, traumas, threats or severe stress. Being resilient does not mean not feeling discomfort, emotional pain, or difficulty in adversity. However, people living with HIV are usually able to overcome their diagnosis and adapt well over time. Resilience involves a series of behaviors and ways of thinking that anyone can learn and develop. I believe resilient people have three main characteristics: Know how to accept reality as it is; Have a deep belief that life makes sense; And have an unwavering ability to adapt to almost anything, often making the best out of it.

Resilient people usually possess a good dosage of realistic optimism. A positive vision of the future without being carried away by unreality or fantasies. Our perceptions and thoughts influence the way we deal with stress and adversity. We don’t run away from problems but face them head on and seek creative and innovative solutions. It involves seeing problems as challenges that we can overcome and not as terrible threats. Challenges are opportunities for learning and growing. I think blessings sometimes come in ugly packages, but what is inside could be the gift of a lifetime. “We are shaped by our thoughts; we become what we think.”– Buddha.

Which takes me to Gratefulness. Gratitude is a major contributor to resilience. When we focus on what we have, we realize that what we might be missing is not as important. It allows us to focus on life from a place of abundance versus a place of deficit. Gratitude improves physical and psychological health. Studies have shown that people living with HIV who practice gratefulness are more likely to take care of their heath, exercise and have good medication adherence. Developing an attitude of gratitude is one of the simplest ways to improve quality of life and sense of wellbeing.

Life is a blessing, with all the good and the not so good. The notion that whatever our journey might be, is unique and wonderful as it is. This is what makes life worth living. We just must be present to enjoy it, and the present moment is a gift, that’s why is called The Present. Please join us in raising awareness about HIV Long-Term Survivors contributions and accomplishments, as well as needs, issues, and journeys.

Yours in the Struggle,

AIDS United Responds to Fiscal Year 2017 Omnibus Appropriations Bil

 

AIDS United acknowledges that the Fiscal Year 2017 omnibus appropriations bill, released last night, provides continuity of HIV funding for most domestic programs. This is an important development for maintaining our progress towards the national goals and priorities of reducing new HIV infections, increasing access to care and improving health outcomes for people living with HIV, and reducing HIV-related health disparities.

While most HIV programs will see level funding in the budget, AIDS United is concerned that a $4 million cut to Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Part C clinical providers and a $5 million cut affecting the budget to fight sexually transmitted infections will diminish our response to HIV and health care, particularly given the increasing cases of sexually transmitted infections, such as syphilis, among men who have sex with men.

“Knowing that Congress plans to keep funding intact for most HIV efforts is reassuring, but we urge Congress to also ensure that Part C clinical providers and our response to sexually transmitted infections are fully funded,” said AIDS United President & CEO Jesse Milan, Jr.

AIDS United is particularly appreciative that Congress listened to the voices of people living with and affected by HIV in increasing funding for the Housing Opportunities for People With AIDS (HOPWA) program by $21 million. “Housing is fundamental to ensuring that people living with HIV live longer and healthier lives and we thank Congress for recognizing the importance of this program by securing its current stability,” said Milan.


About AIDS United: AIDS United’s mission is to end the AIDS epidemic in the U.S., through strategic grant-making, capacity building, formative research and policy. AIDS United works to ensure access to life-saving HIV/AIDS care and prevention services and to advance sound HIV/AIDS-related policy for U.S. populations and communities most impacted by the epidemic. To date, our strategic grant-making initiatives have directly funded more than $104 million to local communities, and have leveraged more than $117 million in additional investments for programs that include, but are not limited to HIV prevention, access to care, capacity building, harm reduction and advocacy. aidsunited.org

Top 10 Questions About Living With HIV

 

By

Joel Gallant, MD, MPH

 

1. What’s my prognosis?

Your prognosis is excellent, especially if you’re diagnosed early, get started on medications right away, and take your medication daily. Under those circumstances, your life expectancy can be the same as it would have been without HIV. Even people who are diagnosed or treated after their immune system has been weakened can still do very well on treatment. The keys to a long and healthy life with HIV are getting good medical care and adhering to therapy.

2. How does HIV make you sick?

Untreated HIV infection causes a steady decline in CD4 cells, a type of white blood cell that protects you against certain infections and cancers. As the CD4 count falls, your risk of these complications increases. “Opportunistic infections” (OIs) are infections that don’t happen to people with healthy immune systems, but can occur in people with low CD4 counts (usually less than 200 cells/mm3). And a weakened immune system (“immunosuppression”) isn’t the only problem caused by HIV. Even at high CD4 counts, HIV infection causes chronic inflammation and activation of the immune system, which may increase the risk of some long-term complications such as heart attack, dementia, osteoporosis, and cancers. Fortunately, HIV treatment restores CD4 cells and reduces inflammation and immune activation, preventing most complications.

3. What are the most important lab tests to follow?

The CD4 count measures the health of your immune system. It predicts your risk of complications and determines the urgency of treatment. A count above 500 cells/mm3 is normal. If your count is below 200 cells/mm3, you’re at risk of developing OIs and are considered to have AIDS. The viral load measures the amount of virus in the blood. It’s the best measure of how well treatment is working. Effective treatment should reduce the viral load to undetectable levels (usually less than 20 copies/mL) within a few months, and that’s where it should stay.There are many other recommended lab tests that assess your general health and monitor the effects of treatment. Most people with HIV get lab work every 3-6 months.

4. How do I prevent OIs and cancers?

The best way to prevent these complications is to keep your CD4 count high and your viral load undetectable on treatment. But if you’ve just been diagnosed and your CD4 count is low, your doctor may put you on OI “prophylaxis”: medications to prevent common OIs. Prophylaxis is usually temporary; it can be stopped after you’ve responded to treatment.

There are no medications to prevent cancer, but it’s important to get the recommended screening tests. For colon cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer, the recommendations are the same as for HIV-negative people. Cervical and anal cancer, caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), can be more aggressive in people with HIV, and the screening recommendations (using cervical and anal Pap smears) are different. Young people should get the HPV vaccine to prevent infection with this cancer-causing virus.

5. How do I avoiding infecting someone else?

Maintaining an undetectable viral load on treatment is the best form of prevention. People with undetectable viral loads don’t transmit HIV infection. Of course you don’t get your viral load measured every day, so you may want to take additional precautions, especially if you’re recently started treatment or if your viral load hasn’t been suppressed for very long. Wearing condoms provides added protection, especially for the highest risk activities (anal or vaginal intercourse with the HIV-positive partner “on top”). HIV-negative partners can also choose to take pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), taking a medication called Truvada daily to prevent infection

 

6. What else should I be doing to protect my health?

 

Since you’re unlikely to die of AIDS, your goal should be to live a long, healthy life and then die of old age. For the most part, that means the same thing for you as it would for anyone else: exercise regularly, don’t smoke, eat a healthy diet, avoid drug use and excessive alcohol consumption, and get the recommended vaccinations and screening tests. There are a few recommendations that are different for people with HIV, but for the most part, a healthy lifestyle is a healthy lifestyle. There are no special diets you need to follow if you have HIV, and unless your CD4 count is low, there are no foods that having HIV requires you to avoid. In most communities, drinking tap water is fine. If you eat a healthy diet, you don’t need to take vitamins or supplements; the one exception might be vitamin D, a vitamin that most people seem to be deficient in these days. Since people with HIV are at greater risk of osteoporosis, maintaining normal vitamin D levels is probably a good idea. Ask your doctor before taking other vitamins and supplements, as some can interact with HIV medications

 

7.  Are my medications toxic?

 

Many of the earlier HIV medications were difficult, sometimes causing side effects such as nausea, diarrhea, anemia, fatigue and toxicities (damage to the body) like liver problems, high cholesterol, diabetes, heart disease, and/or body shape changes. Fortunately, that’s not the case with the medications we use today, which is one of the reasons why we now recommend treatment for everyone. If they occur at all, side effects are usually mild and temporary. There are few long-term toxicities, and they’re no longer inevitable.

 

Still, it’s important to be monitored regularly while you’re on treatment, both to make sure it’s working and to make sure it’s not causing problems. When side effects or toxicity occur, you can easily switch medications provided your viral load is suppressed. Stopping therapy is never a good idea. It allows your viral load to rebound, your CD4 count to fall, and can lead to drug resistance. If you don’t like the regimen you’re on, don’t stop it; talk to your provider about making a change.

 

8.  Will my virus become resistant to my medications?

 

Not if you take them. Resistance occurs when the virus mutates in a way that allows it to replicate (reproduce) despite the presence of drugs. The virus can’t mutate unless it’s replicating, and it can’t do that if it’s constantly suppressed by therapy. If you stop taking your medications or miss multiple doses, the virus can replicate. If there is still some drug in your blood, virus with mutations that make it resistant to those drugs can be selected and become the predominant strain. When that happens, you’ll need a resistance test to find out which drugs will still be effective, and then you’ll need to change your regimen.

 

It’s possible to be infected by a virus that’s already resistant to drugs, which is why a baseline resistance test is now recommended for everyone at the time of diagnosis. When transmitted resistance is present, it’s important to customize your drug regimen based on the test results, ensuring that you’ll be on a fully active drug combination.

 

9. Can I still have children?

 

Yes, you can. If you’re a woman with HIV, taking medications during pregnancy will prevent transmission to the baby, as long as your viral load is undetectable at the time of delivery. If you’re a man, your HIV infection doesn’t directly affect the infant, who can only be infected by the mother. Your priority should be not infecting your partner if she’s HIV-negative. It’s critical that you have an undetectable viral load on treatment before you try to conceive. Some women with HIV-positive partners may also choose to take pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for added protection.

 

10.  When will there be a cure?

 

Curing HIV will be a challenge. Until very recently, there was no cure for any viral disease. They either ran their course and resolved on their own (the common cold), were preventable by vaccination (measles), or stayed with you for life (herpes). Now that we can cure hepatitis C, that rule has been broken, but HIV is far more complicated because of “latency”: the DNA of the virus gets inserted into human DNA in cells that live for a very long time. As a result, cure is not a matter of killing virus or of stopping replication, which we can do now, but of eliminating all viral DNA from latently infected cells. Scientists are looking at ways to do that by “activating” (waking up) the latent cells, by genetically modifying those cells so they can’t be infected, or by removing the inserted viral DNA from the human DNA. We will probably achieve a cure someday, but I don’t think it’s just around the corner.

 

In the meantime, we’ve made truly remarkable progress with treatment. There aren’t many chronic diseases that we can treat so effectively with a single, well-tolerated pill per day. When a cure comes, it probably won’t be as simple or non-toxic as treatment, and it might even be less of a sure thing. It wouldn’t surprise me if some people chose to stick with lifelong therapy over cure… but I hope I’m wrong.

In Congress, Obamacare Replacement Plans Start To Emerge

 

Just twenty-five days into the 115th Congress, the Republican congressional majority has made significant steps to make good on campaign promises to repeal the ACA and setup President Trump for swift action on his other top priorities. Republicans kicked off a policy retreat in Philadelphia Wednesday that extends through Friday evening where they hope to hash out how to repeal and replace Obamacare.
While Republicans have had the last six years, and five-dozen attempts to overturn the ACA and plot a replacement, no clear consensus has risen on what to do following repeal. Adding to the uncertainty of how they might repeal and replace Obama’s signature law, is the assertion by President Trump that he will send his own plan to Congress, once his Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary nominee, Tom Price is confirmed. The notion of the White House sending legislation to Congress is unnerving for many lawmakers and calls into question the separation of powers. Senator Rand Paul M.D. (R-KY), who introduced The Obamacare Replacement Act (S.222) this week, said in a statement that, “Sometimes you get ideas from the White House,” which underscores the atypical nature of President Trumps desired path toward repeal.

The Paul Replacement 

Sen. Paul’s bill has several provisions including an immediate repeal of the individual and employer mandates, the essential health benefits requirement, and other insurance mandates. Further the bill would allow unlimited deposits into Health Savings Accounts and broaden options for using those funds; allow the purchasing of insurance across state lines; and create voluntary associations for insurance pooling.

Cassidy-Collins replacement 

Sens. Bill Cassidy (R-LA) and Susan Collins (R-ME) held a press conference Monday to propose three options states could consider moving forward with health care coverage. States could either keep the Affordable Care Act (ACA) but with reduced federal funding for subsidies, switch to a different system to purchase insurance coverage, again with reduced subsidies , or go forward with an alternate plan that does not include federal assistance. The Cassidy-Collins proposal is in direct contrast to plans discussed by House and Senate leadership, which would not let the ACA continue in any form. Cassidy notes that this proposal serves as a middle-way approach that could potentially bridge Democrats’ and Republicans’ concerns. However, the Cassidy-Collins one-page compromise still needs legislative language.

Cassidy noted:
“At some point in this process, we will need a bill that can get to 60 votes. Now you can say to a blue-state senator who is invested in supporting Obamacare, ‘You can keep it, but why force it on us?’” Collins, affirms saying, “I believe most states would embrace this option, which allows states to cover the uninsured by providing a standard plan that has a high-deductible, basic pharmaceutical coverage, some preventive care and free immunizations.”

The question is, what does the rest of Congress think?

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) described the proposal as “an empty facade that would create chaos.” Schumer wasn’t the only Democrat that predicted insurmountable challenges in the Cassidy-Collins proposal. Democratic leadership call into question the idea of giving some states the option to dismantle the current health care law and replace it with something else or nothing at all, for that matter. Conversely, Republican leadership hasn’t publicly commented much on the generality of the bill. Furthermore, Republicans have persistently supported the dismantling of the current health care law’s taxes and fees.

Presidential Executive Order 

As one of his first actions last Friday, Trump signed an executive order intended to minimize the economic burden of the ACA, pending its repeal. The order allows the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and other federal agencies to use their existing powers “to the maximum extent permitted by law” to weaken the ACA. HHS and agencies such as the IRS “were given vast discretion over key parts of the law including the individual and employer mandates,” per Pro Health Care’s Brianna Ehley. What this could mean is that it is possible to stop the individual mandate from being enforced.

In addition to President Trump’s actions, there was a congressional hearing, at which Republican members sought to expose what they perceive to be a decrease in marketplace competition and affordability. The hearing examined the “Failures of Obamacare.” There was also a hearing on theACA Individual Mandate. The hearing on the Price Nomination for HHS Secretary was also a forum for Republican senators to air their ACA-related grievances.

As HIV advocates we remain vigilant in the changing landscape and continue to seek intelligence and influence the proposed changes to our health care systems. It is imperative that the ACA not be repealed without a replacement that protects the expanded access the law has brought. We must insure vulnerable population, including people living with or at risk for HIV, are provided the access to care they deserve.

Posted By: AIDS United, Policy Department – Friday, January 27, 2017

5 Things To Know About Rep. Tom Price’s Health 

Rep. Tom Price has introduced his own alternative to the Affordable Care Act four times. The legislation provides an idea of how he might lead the Department of Health And Human Services.

Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Georgia Rep. Tom Price has been a fierce critic of the Affordable Care Act and a leading advocate of repealing and replacing the 2010 health care law.

Price, an orthopedic surgeon from the suburbs of Atlanta, introduced his own legislation to repeal and replace Obamacare in the current Congress and the three previous sessions. Price’s plan, known as the Empowering Patients First Act, was the basis for a subsequent health care proposal unveiled by House Speaker Paul Ryan, with Price’s endorsement, in June.

Price’s major complaint about the ACA is that it puts the government in the middle of the doctor-patient relationship.

“They believe the government ought to be in control of health care,” Price said in June at the American Enterprise Institute event where Ryan unveiled theRepublican proposal to replace Obamacare. “We believe that patients and doctors should be in control of health care,” Price continued. “People have coverage, but they don’t have care.”

Now that President-elect Donald Trump has tapped Price to lead the Department of Health and Human Services, here are five key planks in his own health care proposal.

  1. Price’s plan offers fixed tax credits so people can buy their own insurance on the private market. The credit starts at $1,200 a year and rises with age, but isn’t adjusted for income. Everyone receives the same credit whether they are rich or poor. People on Medicaid, Medicare, the military health plan known as Tricare, or the Veterans Affairs’ health plan could opt instead for the tax credit to buy private insurance.
  2. Price advocates for expansion of health savings accounts, which allow people to save money before taxes to pay for health care. This includes allowing people who are covered by government health programs including Medicare and the VA to contribute to health savings accounts to pay for premiums and copayments. These proposals are included in Ryan’s plan.
  3. People with existing medical conditions couldn’t be denied coverage under Price’s plan as long as they had continuous insurance for 18 months prior to selecting a new policy. If they didn’t, then they could be denied coverage for that condition for up to 18 months after buying a new plan.
  4. The Price proposal limits the amount of money companies can deduct from their taxes for employee health insurance expenses. Companies can deduct up to $20,000 for a family health insurance plan and $8,000 for an individual. The goal is to discourage companies from offering overly generous insurance benefits to their workers. Ryan’s plan proposes a cap on the employer tax deduction but doesn’t specify the level of the cap.
  5. States would get federal money to create so-called high-risk pools under Price’s plan. These are government-run health plans for people with existing medical conditions who can’t get affordable health insurance on the private market. Critics say high-risk pools have been tried in as many as 34 states and largely failed because they were routinely underfunded.

Price has said he’s not wedded to his own ideas and is open to compromise, so the final proposal to replace Obamacare is likely to be a hybrid of his ideas and those hammered out with other Republican House members and presented as Ryan’s plan.

Still, with Price on track to be at the helm of HHS, he would be the one writing the rules to implement whatever legislation is eventually passed.

Repeal Without Replace: Senate Starts Undoing Obamacare With No Replacement

In the wee hours of the morning on Thursday, the Senate took the important first step toward repealing the Affordable Care Act, narrowly approving a budget resolution that lays the groundwork for the undoing of much of President Obama’s signature health care law. The 51-48 vote fell almost entirely along party lines, with Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) being the only Republican to vote against the resolution and no Democrats voting for it. Having passed in the Senate, the budget resolution has been transferred over to the House where it could be voted on as early as this Friday or later, depending on how successful Speaker Ryan is at bringing together an often-fractured House GOP.

If the House passes the Senate resolution, reconciliation instructions will be sent out to the Senate Finance Committee; the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee; and to the House Ways and Means and Energy and Commerce committees. These instructions are designed to get the committees to report legislation that would reduce the federal deficit by at least $1 billion over the next decade. In practice the legislation will be used to repeal certain aspects of the ACA with only a 51-vote majority in the Senate and without having to face the risk of being filibustered by Democrats. This means that the GOP will be able to repeal major provisions of the ACA that affect the federal budget and will have to introduce other legislation to repeal the other provisions, including those that reform health insurance practices.
For people living with or at risk of contracting HIV, the changes that could be made through this reconciliation process will be immense and potentially deadly. Through reconciliation, Congress will be able to repeal the individual mandate to buy coverage, take away the ACA’s insurance premium subsidies and, perhaps worst of all, roll back Medicaid expansion. Medicaid is the single largest source of insurance coverage for people living with HIV, covering more than 40% of all people with HIV who are in care. Add to that the fact that Medicaid expansion by itself was responsible for putting an addition 14 million Americans on health insurance, and it is not hard to understand just how much of an impact this reconciliation process could have on the HIV community.

The Senate vote on the budget resolution was the climax of nearly 7 hours of rapid-fire voting known as “vote-a-rama”, a tradition whereby Senators—in this case, mostly Democrats—are allowed to propose roll call votes on amendments to a budget resolution in quick succession with the aim of getting their colleagues on the record with votes concerning politically volatile issues. On Wednesday night, Democrats put forth a number of amendments regarding some of the popular aspects of Obamacare as both an act of defiance and a way to put pro-repeal Senators on-the-record for the elimination of well received ACA provisions.

For their part, Republicans in the Senate chose in most instances to vote as a unified block even when such a vote went against the wishes of their constituencies. Over the course of the evening, the Senate rejected 19 different amendments along party lines, many of which would have served to protect access to quality, affordable health care for all Americans. Of particular interest to people living with or at risk for contracting HIV were amendments put forth by Senate Democrats aimed at preventing health insurers from discriminating against people based on pre-existing conditions, allowing children to stay on their parents’ health insurance until the age of 26, prohibiting insurers from denying health insurance or raising rates on women because of their gender, and not making any cuts to Medicaid funding. None of these amendments were accepted, but they did provide good indication of what aspects of the ACA would be vulnerable under a full ACA repeal.

Perhaps the most important vote of the night—aside from the final approval of the budget resolution—was one that didn’t happen at all. An amendment put forth by Senator Bob Corker (R-TN) and four other GOP Senators that would have extended the January 27th deadline to come up with repeal legislation by an additional 5 weeks was withdrawn late on Wednesday night. The amendment was initially brought up by Senator Corker and some of his Republican colleagues in light of legitimate fears that their party would not have a replacement plan in place when they repealed the ACA. And, while nothing happened over the course of the evening that would have given Senator Corker and his amendment’s supporters reason to believe a replacement plan was any nearer than before, they would all go on to vote in favor of the budget resolution at the end of the night, continuing down a path of repeal without replacement.

Most of America had long since gone to sleep and likely won’t remember when or exactly how it happened, but history with certainly note that, if the Affordable Care Act is indeed dismantled, that Congress began to do so when no one was watching.

AIDS United: A Harm Reduction Compendium

 

As a result of the opioid epidemic, the concept of harm reduction has come into increasing prominence in the United States. Harm reduction is a strategy designed to reduce harmful consequences of drugs, sex, or other risky behavior by focusing specifically on reducing the harms associated with that behavior rather than focusing on the risk or illegality of the behavior. AIDS United has long advocated for harm reduction policies such as legalizing and funding syringe services programs (SSPs) and allowing or even requiring that condoms be available in prison. With the 11th National Harm Reduction Conference hosted by the Harm Reduction Coalition in sunny San Diego just around the corner, this seems like a good time to provide an overview of some of AIDS United’s current harm reduction activities.

Harm Reduction Conference

AIDS United is participating heavily in this year’s National Harm Reduction Conference as a sponsor, as presenters and exhibitors, and as participants. AIDS United staff are leading several pre-conference workshops designed to help syringe service organizations and harm reduction organizers expand their capacity and increase their sustainability in an era of federal funding for syringe services. AIDS United is participating in a host of workshops throughout the conference – including a funders’ roundtable and a session diving into the federal implementation of syringe services funding – as well as tabling in the exhibitor hall for the duration. We will also be offering on-site technical assistance for any programs looking to apply for – or assist their health department in applying for – federal funding for SSPs.

Federal Funding Implementation

AIDS United has continued to monitor the implementation of federal funding for SSPs, and has produced a variety of resources for advocates and CBOs over the last year. In June, we released a webinar explaining the various implementation guidance documents released by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) as well as the role Community Based Organizations (CBOs) could play in guiding their jurisdiction’s “Determination of Need” process. A follow-up webinar, examining what we’ve learned over the first year of federal funding availability, can be expected in the new calendar year. This fall, we released a series of fact sheets, including an SSP-101 and fact sheets aimed at CBOs and SSP advocates. We continue to offer capacity building and technical assistance for programs interested in expanding services using federal funds through our CDC-funded capacity building program Getting to Zero and our policy department. Finally, we continue to work with our partners within the Coalition for Syringe Access to build upon the victories won in late 2015.

Funding

The Syringe Access Fund (SAF) is a funding collaborative of Elton John AIDS Foundation, Irene Diamond Fund, Levi Strauss Foundation, Open Society Foundations, and AIDS United. It is the largest private funding collaborative for syringe access in the United States. The Fund is currently in the first year of its 9th funding round, with grantees across the country continuing to offer lifesaving services and critical policy advocacy on behalf of people who inject drugs. The Round 10 RFA, covering 2018-2019, is expected to be released in Fall, 2017. To date, the Syringe Access Fund has provided more than $17 million in grants to syringe services programs.

Policy Advocacy

AIDS United continues to support harm reduction policy responses to substance use, and in July became the first national HIV advocacy organization to publicly endorse Supervised Injection Facilities as an HIV/HCV prevention strategy for people who inject drugs, alongside expanded access to Medication Assisted Treatment, layperson-naloxone distribution, Good Samaritan protections, syringe services programs, and non-abstinence based housing first permanent supportive housing programs. This endorsement, supported by our Public Policy Committee, firmly centers harm reduction approaches to HIV prevention for people who inject drugs. With the opioid epidemic continuing to rage, AIDS United expects to only deepen our commitment to advancing harm reduction responses to this public health crisis.

Posted By: AIDS United, Policy Department – Friday, October 28, 2016